Local railway company crests

Rail Around Birmingham
& the West Midlands

Rail Around Birmingham & the West Midlands

 

Bookmark and Share

Email Newsletter:

Name:

Email:

Subscribe 
Unsubscribe 

Sign-up for the free RAB newsletter to be informed of the latest site news and updates.


Rustic farmhouse dining tables, oak benches and handcrafted oak furniture.
www.diningtableandbenches.co.uk


Baptist End Halt, 1956 (John Edgington)
Station Menu
 
Railway News
 

Baptist End Halt

1905 - 1964

Baptist End Halt formed the first stop on the GWR line from Dudley to Halesowen after leaving the OWWR/GWR Dudley-Stourbridge Junction line between Blowers Green and Harts Hill. Opening in 1905, along with three other halts on the line, the halt lasted 59 years before succumbing to closure to passenger services (along with the rest of the line) in 1964. Above we see Baptist End halt in 1956 (photo: John Edgington) looking in the direction of Dudley as a GWR Rail Motor pauses on its way to Halesowen. Although the shelters and platforms seen are wooden, the halt did receive a rebuilt of a more permanent nature in the early 1960s prior to the decision to close the line!

 
Baptist End Halt site from Round Street
Trackbed to Halesowen
 

Above-left we are entering the halt from Round Street - the halt would have been directly ahead with Dudley to the left and Halesowen to the right. Above-right we are looking out towards Halesowen with the halt site immediately to our left with the culvert ahead of us, now drained, discernible in the 1956 shot to the left of the halt.

 
Embankment's end, Baptist End Road
Looking towards Dudley and halt from Baptist End Road
 

Above-left we are on the trackbed proper with the halt to our rear. This is the end of the embankment and ahead is where a bridge would have carried the tracks over Baptist End Road: there being no traces of the line the other side of Baptist End Road today. Above-right we are in the same spot looking back at the halt site in the direction of Dudley. As with the other 'Bumble Hole line' sites, scant evidence remains to attest to its existence. This is, of course, in part due to the change in 'use' of much of the Black Country with what were previously sites surrounded by coal mines, foundries, and various heavy industries, now being used for residential properties. This has necessitated great changes in the landscape with much that was observable surrounding the railway in past shots being completely obliterated, levelled, filled-in or built-upon.

 

Google
 
Web www.railaroundbirmingham.co.uk